Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Politics Update: Trump’s February Comments on “Deadly” COVID-19, Russian Hacking Detected Ahead of Election




US President Donald Trump speaks during a Latinos for Trump Coalition roundtable meeting at the Treasure Island Hotel and Casino on September 13, 2020, in Las Vegas, Nevada.
US President Donald Trump speaks during a Latinos for Trump Coalition roundtable meeting at the Treasure Island Hotel and Casino on September 13, 2020, in Las Vegas, Nevada.
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Listen to story

17:37
Download this story 25MB

President Donald Trump talked in private about the “deadly” coronavirus last February, even as he was declaring to America it was no worse than the flu and insisting it was under control, according to a new book by journalist Bob Woodward. Trump said Wednesday he was just being a “cheerleader” for the nation and trying to keep everyone calm.

His public rhetoric, Trump told Woodward in March, was part of a strategy to deliberately minimize the danger. “I wanted to always play it down,” the president said. “I still like playing it down because I don’t want to create a panic.”

Trump, according to the book, acknowledged being alarmed by the virus, even as he was telling the nation that it would swiftly disappear.

Coming less than eight weeks before Election Day, the revelations in the book — accompanied by recordings Woodward made of his interviews with Trump — provide an unwelcome return of public attention to the president’s handling of the pandemic that has so far killed about 190,000 Americans. He is currently pushing hard for a resumption of normal activity and trying to project strength and control to bolster his political position in his campaign against Democrat Joe Biden.

Additionally, the same Russian military intelligence outfit that hacked the Democrats in 2016 has renewed vigorous U.S. election-related targeting, trying to breach computers at more than 200 organizations including political campaigns and their consultants, Microsoft said Thursday.

The intrusion attempts reflect a stepped up effort to infiltrate the U.S. political establishment, the company said. “What we’ve seen is consistent with previous attack patterns that not only target candidates and campaign staffers but also those who they consult on key issues,” Tom Burt, a Microsoft vice president, said in a blog post. U.K. and European political groups were also probed, he added.

Most of the hacking attempts by Russian, Chinese and Iranian agents were halted by Microsoft security software and the targets notified, he said. The company would not comment on who may have been successfully hacked or the impact.

Questions? Join the conversation by giving us a call at 866-893-5722.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News; he tweets @NPRrelving

Alyza Sebenius, cybersecurity reporter with Bloomberg News; she tweets @asebenius