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The guidebook that kept African Americans safe on Route 66




A road marking of the historic Route 66 sign is seen painted on the street of the town of Kingman, on October 31, 2010. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KLEIN (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images)
A road marking of the historic Route 66 sign is seen painted on the street of the town of Kingman, on October 31, 2010. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KLEIN (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Traveling through the US as a black person in the Thirties was very different to today

As a result,  Victor H. Green, a postal worker from New York, compiled  "The Negro Motorist Green Book" 

The publication listed hundreds of services along Route 66 deemed friendly towards people of color -- including over 200 locations in Los Angeles

Many have long gone, but there's a new effort to protect some of LA's significant historic structures, including some featured in the Green Book.

For more, Take Two's Josie Huang spoke Louis Sahagun. He wrote about this for the LA Times.