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Senator Kamala Harris Ends Presidential Bid, Powerline Technology May Help Prevent Future Fires




Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., listens to testimony at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in September. Kamala, along with Sens. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Tim Scott, R-S.C., proposed the anti-lynching bill passed by the Senate on Wednesday.
Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., listens to testimony at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in September. Kamala, along with Sens. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Tim Scott, R-S.C., proposed the anti-lynching bill passed by the Senate on Wednesday.
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Politics Check-in

A LOT of major stories have developed in the last few days...so we’re here to update you.
The biggest news: Senator Kamala Harris announced today that she’ll end her presidential bid.
Meanwhile, embattled San Diego Congressman Duncan Hunter says he’s stepping down.
He and his wife have been charged with five DOZEN criminal counts including wire fraud and conspiracy. And lastly - we’ll look ahead to the next chapter in the impeachment hearings.

Guests:

Purple Project — 14th Amendment

On KPCC this month, you may have heard familiar voices reading amendments. Actor Levar Burton on the amendment that ended slavery...or television icon Norman Lear on our First Amendment right to free speech.  It's part of the nationwide Purple Project for Democracy, a non-partisan campaign to recommit to democratic values and institutions. Public Radio Host Peter Segal recites the 14th amendment

Powerline Tech

The California Public Utilities Commission, in a recent report, found that Pacific Gas and Electric failed to inspect - and properly maintain — the power line involved in last year's deadly Camp Fire. If it HAD, the CPUC said the ignition that started the wildfire could have been prevented. Additionally, it reported that this was not an isolated incident but "indicative of an overall pattern of inadequate inspection and maintenance of PG&E's transmission facilities."  Faulty electrical lines have been involved in multiple wildfires in recent years, and that has made fire prevention a priority for utility companies, like PG&E and SoCal Edison —and most are rethinking their approach. Enter B. Don Russell. Russell is an electrical engineering professor at Texas A&M University. He and his team have developed a diagnostic tool so utilities to detect electrical issues on the grid before they start fires or create other problems 

Guest:

New LAPD Tool

The Los Angeles Police Department is set to begin training staff on a new, non-lethal method to detain individuals. Next January, officers will start using the handheld BolaWrap device, which fires a Kevlar cord to wrap around a suspect's legs.

Giving Tuesday

It's Giving Tuesday when people all over the world are coming together to give back. When you donate to KPCC today, you can be proud knowing you're supporting a service that makes a difference in your community with trustworthy journalism that’s available to everyone. Give now at KPCC.org

Slow Burn: Biggie and Tupac

Tupac Shakur didn't just help define a generation of music but West Coast rap in general. But he was embroiled in one of the biggest culture feuds of all-time between two hip-hop artists on two coasts. Tupac and Biggie Smalls, two iconic rappers, both in their early 20's, were both shot dead within six months of each other. Both crimes are unsolved over 20 years later. But while you may know that on the surface there was an East Coast vs West Coast rap rivalry, how it all began and all of the forces that kept the tension high is the focus of the podcast Slow Burn season 3—Biggie and Tupac.

Guest:

Riot Games

A Los Angeles gaming company has agreed to pay out 10 million dollars in a gender discrimination settlement. Women employed by the industry giant Riot Games are entitled to that money if they worked for the company in the last five years. According to the settlement, the money would make up for unequal salaries.

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