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Wildfire Consequences, Teachers Of Color And LAPD Radio Shows




SIMI VALLEY, CA - OCTOBER 30: An inmate firefighter from Oak Glen Conservation Camp near Yucaipa, California sets a backfire during the Easy Fire on October 30, 2019 near Simi Valley, California. The National Weather Service issued a rare extreme red flag warning for Southern California for gusts that could be the strongest in more than a decade, exceeding 80 mph, as the fast-moving brush fire threatens the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby residential neighborhoods. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
SIMI VALLEY, CA - OCTOBER 30: An inmate firefighter from Oak Glen Conservation Camp near Yucaipa, California sets a backfire during the Easy Fire on October 30, 2019 near Simi Valley, California. The National Weather Service issued a rare extreme red flag warning for Southern California for gusts that could be the strongest in more than a decade, exceeding 80 mph, as the fast-moving brush fire threatens the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby residential neighborhoods. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images

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Takeaways from the 2019 Fire Season

In 2018, California endured the most destructive wildfire year on record, with a total of 1.8 million acres burned statewide. Last year could’ve been just as disastrous, but by comparison, just 270,000 acres burned—the smallest number recorded since 2011. We learn why that number decreased and what it means for the future of fires in California.

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Power Shutoffs and Cell Towers

Two telecommunications companies spoke before state lawmakers yesterday to explain why so many cellphone towers went down during wildfires last year. The planned power shutoffs were part of it, but officials want carriers to create back-up power systems so that people can still call emergency workers and family members. 

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Wildfire's Impact on Military Bases

As climate change continues, wildfires are becoming more common. KPCC's Jacob Margolis reports on how that affects military bases in Southern California.

California Dream: Teachers of Color Part 1

State Superintendent Tony Thurmond has identified hiring more teachers of color as a priority that’s crucial for closing the achievement gap between students of color and their white peers. Two state universities have innovative programs aimed at recruiting male teachers of color. In a two-part report, Vanessa Rancaño from our California Dream Collaboration has the story.

California Dream: Teachers of Color Part 2

Turnover rates are particularly high for teachers of color, in part because they're more likely to teach in high poverty schools. There are efforts underway to change this with the Black Teachers Project in Oakland, and a pilot program in Compton that CSU Northridge and UC Berkeley are running together. In the second part of her story, Vanessa Rancaño reports.

Historic Filipinotown

Historic Filipinotown is now morphing into something else: HiFi. We learn what that means for the immigrants who created the neighborhood in the first place.

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Throwback Thursday: LAPD Radio Shows

Did you know the LAPD once had a radio show in the late 40’s and 50’s? We hear clips from the old show and learn more about why they did it.

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