News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

Coronavirus Ask an Expert, Throwback Thurday: E. Waldo Ward & Son Marmalades, Aida Rodriguez




ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 18: Healthcare workers screen a patient for COVID-19 at a drive-through coronavirus testing site on March 18, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. Arlington County and Virginia Hospital Center have opened a temporary drive-through coronavirus testing site for Arlington residents and county employees with a letter from a licensed health-care provider. The results for patients tested are estimated to be available in 5-7 days. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 18: Healthcare workers screen a patient for COVID-19 at a drive-through coronavirus testing site on March 18, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. Arlington County and Virginia Hospital Center have opened a temporary drive-through coronavirus testing site for Arlington residents and county employees with a letter from a licensed health-care provider. The results for patients tested are estimated to be available in 5-7 days. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Listen to story

52:05
Download this story 37MB

Coronavirus Ask an Expert 

The increase in cases is expected. It will take weeks for our quarantine efforts to show its fruits but it does not mean it is not working. Earlier this morning, the Trump Administration during a press briefing said it asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to "fast-track" antiviral treatments for coronavirus. To answer our questions about this and other matters related to the COVID-19 virus, we turn to Dr. Robert Kim-Farley. He's with UCLA's Fielding School of Public Health, and a former staffer with the Centers For Disease Control.

Guest: 

Coronavirus Public Transportation

Our professional and personal lives have been dramatically upended by the spread of COVID-19, but regional public transit in greater Los Angeles is still moving. With us to discuss how the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority is changing it systems in light of coronavirus is LAist’s Ryan Fonesca.

Guest:

​Can the Internet Handle the Pressure of Working from Home? 

It's been a lot harder to do business as usual with so many people at home because of the coronavirus.
Sure it might be nice to do that conference call in your sweatpants, but some workers are missing face-to-face contact with their coworkers and while the technology is there, we all know its not perfect. Many companies have started using videoconferencing services like Zoom to communicate with their employees. But as people start using more video chats and relying on that extra secure Virtual Private Network, or VPN, to log into work they're putting an unprecedented strain on the nation's internet infrastructure. So - how will it all hold up during this time of quarantine? Let's ask Josephine Wolff, assistant professor of cybersecurity policy at Tufts University. She's the author of a recent New York Times op-ed titled "The Internet Isn't Ready For Coronavirus."

Guest:

Midshow Moment of Zen 

With so much going on these days, it can be hard to find a little peace of mind. So - as often as possible - we're going to bring you encouraging words from members of our community to help you slow down, take a breath and find peace. We bring you a piece written and read by former Pasadena resident Cameron Bellm. It's titled "Prayer for a Pandemic."

TBT: E. Waldo Ward & Son Marmalades

Sitting in the shadow of Mount Wilson, in the heart of Sierra Madre, there's a little yellow house that holds the story of a local business that's more than 100-years old. This business — E. Waldo Ward & Son Marmalades — has lived through the many phases of LA, but many of it's recipes remain the same. Esotouric's Richard Schave tells A Martinez more.

Guest:

Aida Rodriguez (Part 2)

Comedian Aida Rodriguez has lived a lot of life in her 42 years. And it wasn't always sunny. As a kid, she was kidnapped twice, once by her mom from her dad, then from her mom by her grandma and uncle. But she managed to get college where she met her future husband - an NFL player. Got divorced, moved to LA and lived with her 2 kids in her car. Now, most of her life story goes into her act as a stand-up comedian. You can hear Aida on Tiffany Haddish's Netflix special "They Ready" and in a coming HBO Max sitcom based on her life. 

Guest: