News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 pm

The Politics of Newsom Lifting Statewide Stay-At-Home Orders, Outdoor Dining Resumes in LA County, Media Literacy in 2021




LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 22: People, some wearing face masks, walk in Griffith Park with the Hollywood sign behind them on March 22, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Now that Governor Newsom has lifted stay-at-home orders again, Los Angeles will see more businesses open up.
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 22: People, some wearing face masks, walk in Griffith Park with the Hollywood sign behind them on March 22, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Now that Governor Newsom has lifted stay-at-home orders again, Los Angeles will see more businesses open up.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Listen to story

49:22
Download this story 35MB

THE POLITICS OF NEWSOM LIFTING STAY AT HOME ORDERS

Governor Gavin Newsom announced he is lifting the statewide stay-at-home order. The decision surprised many of us this morning, but he said he made the move because things are, well, looking brighter in California - case counts and hospitalizations are down, for example. Still, the Governor noted, we are not out of the woods yet...so what's behind the sudden change of policy… and where do we go from here? For more on the politics of this decision, we talk to Carla Marinucci, who follows all the happenings in Sacramento for Politico. 

EPIDEMIOLOGIST ON STAY-AT-HOME ORDERS BEING LIFTED: 'JUST CAUSE YOU CAN, DOESN'T MEAN YOU SHOULD'

There's been a lot of questions about the stay-at-home orders and vaccines and everything else coronavirus-related. To answer those, A Martinez talks to Professor Anne Rimoin, an infectious disease specialist, at UCLA. She's also talk about research published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finding that that near-universal adoption of non-medical masks in public, combined with complementary public health measures, could reduce spread of the coronavirus to essentially zero.

MEDIA LITERACY STILL REMAINS A PRIORITY IN 2021 

We talk about media literacy with Alison Trope, a clinical professor at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism and the founder of the web-based media literacy resource called “Critical Media Project.”

EMPOWERING STUDENTS AT LOCKE COLLEGE PREP IN WATTS 

One of the highlights of the inauguration this week was hearing from National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman. Her poem, “The Hill We Climb,” evoked the deadly insurrection at the Capitol, and appealed for bravery in the face of darkness. Using language to empower is something Gorman says she learned from her mother, a middle school teacher in Watts. This week another school in Watts — Locke College Preparatory Academy — has been looking for ways to empower students in the aftermath of the violence in Washington. KQED’s education reporter Vanessa Rancaño says the school is making space for students to take on leadership roles and create the change they want to see.