News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 pm

Asian-American communities under attack, 'Minari' a film for this moment, Godzilla vs. Kong is out




A family wearing face masks and holding signs take part in a rally
A family wearing face masks and holding signs take part in a rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence, at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles, California, on March 13.
Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images

Listen to story

Download this story 0MB

SHAKEN AND AFRAID ASIAN COMMUNITIES UNSETTLED IN WAKE OF ANTI-ASIAN VIOLENCE

People attend a community rally to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence and racist attitudes, held at Los Angeles Historic Park near the Chinatown district in Los Angeles, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021.
People attend a community rally to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence and racist attitudes, held at Los Angeles Historic Park near the Chinatown district in Los Angeles, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021.
Damian Dovarganes/AP

The recent spike in anti-asian violence has left many communities unsettled and afraid. KPCC's Josie Huang talks to A Martinez about the impact of this on people's mental health and what help might be available.

Guest:

NAVIGATING LIFE AS A KOREAN-AMERICAN: AN ESSAY

LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 01:  Changing colors of lights decorate a nightclub in the trendy section of Koreatown on November 1, 2006 in Los Angeles, California. A series of high-profile murders, including the recent shooting deaths of three people in a restaurant, has many Koreatown residents afraid to go out after dark and local businessmen fearing a negative effect on South Korean investors and tourists. So far this year, Koreatown homicides have jumped 40 percent as rapes increased 47 percent and robberies 11percent. Koreatown has been growing its trendy section of luxury condominiums, fancy restaurants and nightclubs, and exclusive stores since it was hard-hit by the 1992 Los Angeles riots and gangs persist in Koreatown and the surrounding areas.  (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 01: Changing colors of lights decorate a nightclub in the trendy section of Koreatown on November 1, 2006 in Los Angeles, California. A series of high-profile murders, including the recent shooting deaths of three people in a restaurant, has many Koreatown residents afraid to go out after dark and local businessmen fearing a negative effect on South Korean investors and tourists. So far this year, Koreatown homicides have jumped 40 percent as rapes increased 47 percent and robberies 11percent. Koreatown has been growing its trendy section of luxury condominiums, fancy restaurants and nightclubs, and exclusive stores since it was hard-hit by the 1992 Los Angeles riots and gangs persist in Koreatown and the surrounding areas. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images

Four of the women killed in the Atlanta-area shootings earlier this month were Korean. This fact has sparked a lot of dialogue among high school students who attend an oral history workshop at the Koreatown Youth and Community Center in Los Angeles. The focus: how to navigate life as Korean-American women in a climate where there's already so much uncertainty. Katherine Kim runs the workshop and shared this essay with The California Report Magazine from KQED.

Guest:

WHY 'MINARI' IS SO AMERICAN 

Steven Yeun and Alan Kim in
Steven Yeun and Alan Kim in "Minari."
A24

The film “Minari” is about a Korean-American family that moves from California to Arkansas. It was shot entirely in the United States and tells a quintessential story of the immigrant experience in the U.S. The film has received rave reviews and just won a Golden Globe for best Foreign Language film, but because the majority of the film is in Korean, it did not qualify for best drama at the Golden Globes.

Guest:

ON THE LOT

Photo by DualD FlipFlop via Flickr Creative Commons

Godzilla vs. Kong hits HBO Max and movie theaters today and it's expected to have the biggest box office opening of the pandemic this weekend. Plus, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences loosens in-person Oscar plans and plans to set up European venues. 

Guest: